On 5/5/07, Cliff Rowley <cliffrowley / gmail.com> wrote:
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Gregory Brown [mailto:gregory.t.brown / gmail.com]
> > Sent: 05 May 2007 15:04
> > To: ruby-talk ML
> > Subject: Re: Ruby love
> >
> > It's potentially a very good way to help address the broader
> > issue by simple, direct participation.  Teaching person to
> > person might be one way to reduce the tensions that arise in
> > academic or professional settings.
>
> Let's not forget that it's fun in all this =D  Athena really enjoyed coding
> with me, and she got the same buzz from telling the computer what to do as I
> did when I started.  That's all it takes.

I actually typed something about fun and deleted it.   The fun factor
is key, teaching anything as a hobby.  (possibly just teaching
anything)

> > That's why I think parents who have daughters who seem to
> > enjoy the computer might want to introduce them to Hackity
> > Hack, or programmers who have cousins or sisters or a friend
> > who always ask them interesting questions about computing
> > might be able to give them a lesson or two.
> >
> > It won't magically make things better, but it could make a
> > difference, I think.
>
> On the contrary, ultimately I think this is the key.  Programming is one of
> those 'spark' things.  It's not a career you generally 'fall into' per se.
> Most people see a computer as a black box of tricks with total ignorance of
> the myriad of man hours spent behind the scenes making it all happen.  It's
> a whole world you either see or you don't.  Thinking back, I can name a fair
> few people I've introduced to programming who are now professional in some
> capacity, and they've all been friends.

Yeah, I suppose it really could make a difference.   I blogged about
this issue just now on ORA, as I wanted to de-hijack this thread.

http://www.oreillynet.com/ruby/blog/2007/05/ruby_and_women.html

I personally think it'd be a good thing if those who are out there
teaching females to program could take notes on it and see if you run
into any differences in styles (similar to what Philip) posted.  I
think a lot of stuff will be simply differences between *people*, but
if there are more common trends, it could be helpful to investigate
them.