On 5/2/07, John Joyce <dangerwillrobinsondanger / gmail.com> wrote:
>
> On May 3, 2007, at 1:16 AM, Ryan Davis wrote:
>
> >
> > On May 2, 2007, at 08:57 , John Joyce wrote:
> >
> >> On OS X 10.4.9
> >>
> >> When trying to run a simple file starting with:
> >> require 'rubygems'
> >> require 'mysql'
> >> ...
> >>
> >> I get this:
> >> /usr/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/rubygems/custom_require.rb:27:in
> >> `gem_original_require': no such file to load -- mysql (LoadError)
> >>         from /usr/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/rubygems/
> >> custom_require.rb:27:in `require'
> >>         from mysql_ruby.rb:3
> >>
> >> But when I do a local:
> >> gem list my
> >>
> >> mysql (2.7)
> >>
> >> So I know it is there. Other gems seem fine. irb also says there
> >> is no mysql gem.
> >> MySQL is installed and running. With Rails it works.
> >> What I am doing is not Rails, but is Ruby.
> >> Can anybody help out?
> >
> > First, this is a good problem report. I'd like to see more people
> > writing the list with such good problem descriptions.
> >
> > Has it ever worked? If not, then you probably ignored/missed an
> > error on gem install with it complaining about not being able to
> > build. There will be a log file in the gem's dir stating what went
> > wrong. Chances are it is missing/unknown config/headers. Rebuild it
> > by doing gem install again. You'll probably have to do something
> > similar to:
> >
> > sudo gem install mysql -- --with-mysql-config=/opt/local/bin/
> > mysql_config5
>
> Thanks for the compliment. I've seen enough help requests over the
> years on lists like this and in person where people are indeed in
> need but haven't thought about the right questions or presented all
> the details. It's not their fault usually, they need to be gently
> educated on how to ask for help with problems. It's like going to the
> mechanic and saying "my car makes a strange noise". So the mechanic
> learns to teach everyone how to report problems. We have to do that too.
>
> Anyway, I see from your response you are using MacPorts (a.k.a
> DarwinPorts).
> I'm not using that. (the convenience of package management, gem is no
> exception, is also a problem when things do go wrong, because the
> dependencies are hidden, so we don't know what they are)
>
> Yes, the mysql gem has worked. Rails with mysql depends on it. So it
> works, or has worked before, or seemed to.
> I stopped messing with Rails and decided to focus on getting a good
> grounding in Ruby first since one of the big problems with the Rails
> community is all the people who mistakenly believe Rails somehow
> doesn't require Ruby or other skills. (some Rails based apps are
> getting closer to being consumer-friendly like many PHP apps are, but
> not quite there yet, and developing a Rails app will never be a no-
> Ruby-knowledge-needed situation.)
>
> It's been a while and I didn't make notes at the time (my mistake)
> but I seem to remember reinstalling this gem long ago.
>
>


Rails works is no guarantee of the fact that, you  have broken build
of mysql C extension. Its because rails ships with its own drivers,
which it will use, if it can't find native mysql drivers, which are a
lot more faster.

Now as zenspider said, please try to do "gem install mysql" and see if
it gets installed properly. Because of various reasons I have seen,
when native C extensions fail to build using gem command, they still
get installed in WHATEVER_GEM_PATH. Of course, they are of little use
and usually as zenspider suggested mkmf.log, contains a log of build
errors.

May be, in future, a failed build shouldn't install anything in
WHATEVER_GEM_PATH and do proper reporting of errors.