On Apr 6, 1:25 pm, John Joyce <dangerwillrobinsondan... / gmail.com>
wrote:
> It depends on what you want to do.
> But here goes,
> 1. You can learn Ruby and at the same time learn XHTML + CSS

Hmmm.  Okay. Personally, I'd put learning XHTML, CSS with learning
Javascript and DOM. Ruby is a mind twister and should be taken in it's
own time IMHO.

> 2. Before concerning too much about AJAX you'll need to learn some  
> JavaScript and DOM scripting as well, but while learning that, you  
> need an understanding of how web sites really work: how pages are  
> requested, served and then handled by user-agents (browsers).
> Don't worry, none of it is all that difficult, it's just a lot to  
> learn at once!

Yes.

> 3. After you feel comfortable with XHTML and CSS, and perhaps a  
> little bit about XML, take a look at AJAX and if you haven't, XML too.
> AJAX itself is not complicated. The fancier things are not simple,  
> though. But at this point, the skills you learn in Ruby and in XHTML  
> + CSS (actually XML!) and a bit of DOM scripting (JavaScript) things  
> start to converge with AJAX (and things like REST, SOAP)
> But if you go to all this effort, you should go ahead and learn some  
> SQL of some sort too, because most of this stuff ends up going into  
> or out of a database. So add MySQL or PostgreSQL or SQLite to the mix!

Yes, this too.

> The big hint though: to really make use of AJAX you need to  
> understand the DOM and that each browser has a slightly different  
> implementation (well this is true of so many things!) AJAX is  
> basically simple, but there is a lot to learn to get there. The  
> question is, is the reward worth the effort? In the end you may find  
> that it is just a really difficult way to make a Flash page... (now I  
> duck for cover...)

To make a Flash page behave like an Ajax page you will need to:

1. Learn Actionscript with is simply the Flash flavored version of
Javascript.
2. Learn Flash
3. Learn Flex which adds an XML UI description format on top of  AJAX.
4. Learn how to integrate Flex with the aforementioned databases (I'm
guessing here, maybe Flex has some magic SQL-less way to access
databases)

And when you are done with these things you will have a nice Flash
movie that is fast and slick and is completely isolated from the
browser's DOM. Some consider this a good thing but I think it's very
limiting at this time. So no, Ajax is more a difficult way to make an
even more difficult Flash page. But Flash does enable one to keep a
connection from flash objects to a flash server open so that you can
push data periodically to the page. This goes a step beyond Ajax and
is only barely implementable with an HttpRequest object and an Apache
server.

Bob