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I largely agree with Pat's comments.

Most of the people I know who are writing code in Ruby (or Rails) fall in 6
broad categories.

1. For fun "scratch the itch" projects. [I belong to this one]
2. Open source projects (Rubyforge/Sourceforge), again for fun or "in good
spirit"
3. For profit, but mostly small consultancy work for small "Mom and Pop"
enterprises.
4. Slightly bigger consultancy/contracting work but mostly under $20k
variety.
5. Free software but paid support (again very small scales 2-5k support)
6. Marginal scripting work inside big companies. (underground/stealth Ruby
activity)

I have three questions for Rubyists -

- Is this the trend they have seen in their enviornments too?

- If yes then is this the trend we want to continue to see going forward?

- Is a big sized company, like IBM selling "enterprise software" [think
Websphere] written in Ruby for a license and a price tag, an anathema?

Personally I think that as the popularity of Ruby grows and there are more
and more adopters, it is inevitable that there will be some enterprise spin
to it with big corporations coming with their own "Enterprise Edition"
software in Ruby, including the runtimes.
Rails has been a big differentiator and has broken the glass ceiling imposed
on other "scripting" languages. Now that Ruby is in limelight, I think
Rubyists owe it to themselves to capitalize on this business opportunity.

~nasir


On 3/30/07, Pat Maddox <pergesu / gmail.com> wrote:
>
> On 3/30/07, Jeremy Henty <jeremy / chaos.org.uk> wrote:
> > On 2007-03-30, S. Robert James <srobertjames / gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > > I've used http-access2, soap4r, REXML, popen4, rubygems, etc., and
> > > the Ruby interpreter itself, and eventually hit bugs in every single
> > > one of these, at least on some platforms.
> >
> > I've used Oracle and hit bugs.  I guess that proves that Oracle isn't
> > enterprise ready.  (OK, it was Oracle 8, but still...)
>
> I don't think these are concerns that Robert has.  They're concerns
> that the enterprise community as a whole has, he's just essentially
> relaying them to us.
>
> We're not discussing the legitimacy of these concerns.  For the most
> part we believe they're just ill-conceived.  But the fact is that they
> exist, and because they exist we can't explain them away with plenty
> of reason.
>
> Simply put, we can't address those concerns directly.  We must ask why
> those concerns exist, whether we want to eliminate them, and why, if
> not, we don't want to.
>
> Ultimately does this come down to a question of developing culture.
> Is the current Ruby culture willing to accept an enterprise culture in
> the future?  Are we threatened by them?  Are we going to let them in
> but still treat them as outsiders?  Should we try to exclude them
> completely?
>
> Bottom line is that curiosity will win over flimsy reasons every
> time...so unless you have a damn good reason as to why we should
> exclude the enterprise, they're going to make their way into our
> culture.  We should do what we can to make them comfortable, and
> hopefully guide them to a better way but understand when we can't.  If
> we're afraid that our culture will be ruined by a tiny drop of poison,
> we don't have a culture strong enough worth protecting.
>
>

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