John Joyce wrote:

> That's it basically. It can be more complex and sophisticated, like 
> Rails or WordPress.
> For simple sites, templates are an easier way to maintain much of it.
> For bigger sites with more complex systems behind them, you find that 
> templates are still there!

And this is where CSS comes in: the division of "Website logic" and 
Website layout. You can use that to great effect, especially with a 
server-side scripting language.

At least, in theory, but I have no experience on how to do this kind of 
stuff.

> The only parts that would be different for any page are the content.
> As you can start to see for bigger sites, content and title and link 
> variables start to be obvious targets for a database, if the site is big 
> enough. Don't bother with a database unless you know you have a lot of 
> stuff for a site.

Or use a small one, like SQLite, which has a very nice Ruby interface 
(either via sqlite3-ruby, or ruby-dbi). Very good to practice with 
databases (as it is very, very small), at least, and supposedly used for 
websites, too, with medium traffic (around 1M per day, AFAIK).

-- 
Phillip "CynicalRyan" Gawlowski

Rule of Open-Source Programming #15:

If you like it, let the author know. If you hate it, let the author
know why.