On 3/13/07, 7stud 7stud <dolgun / excite.com> wrote:

> I took a look at "Ruby for Rails" in the bookstore, and the preface says
> you need previous experience with Rails.  Do you think the book is
> appropriate for someone who has no experience with Ruby or with Rails?

Well here's what it says:  "You need to know somthing about the Rails
framework. You don't need to be a grizzled Rails veteran; you can use
this book as part of your growth as a Rails developer. But you should
have a sense of the realm in whcih Rails operates -- or, if you're
really new to Rails, be willing to combine this book with other
sources of information to get the combined picture by working on
several fronts.

David, actually covers Rails starting from near square one.  The book
builds a sample rails app, much like the first section of AWDWR.

> I also took a look at the new sitepoint book "Build Your Own Ruby on
> Rails Web Applications"(copyright 2007)
...
> One thing I liked about it: detailed installation
> instructions.  Not such a big deal for windows users because of one
> click installation packages, but there are detailed installation
> instructions for Mac OS 10.4, and separate installation instructions for
> Linux.  It's true there are installation instructions for Mac OS 10.4 on
> the net, but unfortunately I can't even find the /usr/local directory
> where everything is supposed to be installed.  Am I supposed to create
> that directory?  Who knows.  I hate installation instructions like that;
> you feel lost before you can even start.

This IS one thing with Ruby for Rails doesn't cover.  There are
resources to help, such as the rails web-site and the rails mailing
list.  On the other hand if you really need such detailed instructions
AWDWR does a very good job of leading you step by step.

One thing I like about AWDWR 2nd ed, as opposed to Ruby for Rails is
that it covers migrations and uses them from the beginning to do
database setup and schema evolution.  Ruby for Rails does this using
mysql commands. Some might like that better, but I prefer to stick
with Ruby and Rails for this.  My first encounter with Rails was using
the 1st ed of AWDWR, which was before migrations, when I found out
about them later, I slapped my head like those commercials "Wow! I
could have had a V-8"  (apologies to those who aren't attuned to US
commercials, V-8 is a mixed-vegetable juice).

-- 
Rick DeNatale

My blog on Ruby
http://talklikeaduck.denhaven2.com/