On Mon, Mar 12, 2007 at 10:12:45PM +0900, Rick DeNatale wrote:
> On 3/12/07, Chad Perrin <perrin / apotheon.com> wrote:
> 
> >Back on topic: If you're serious about Rails, and want to start with
> >Rails then move into Ruby, I suspect that the second book you should
> >pick up after Agile Web Development is a book called "Ruby for Rails".
> >I haven't had a chance to go through it at all, but by reputation it is
> >an excellent book as well, and teaches Ruby programming from a Rails
> >perspective, going beyond merely teaching the framework and the minimum
> >of Ruby knowledge necessary to use Rails.
> 
> I might suggest that "Ruby for Rails" might be a good book to start
> with.  It covers both Ruby and Rails in a spiral fashion, giving you a
> little Ruby, then a little Rails, then going back in more depth.
> 
> It doesn't cover Ruby as deeply as the pickaxe, and it doesn't cover
> Rails as deeply as AWDWR (and it's based on Rails 1.1 whereas AWDWR
> 2nd ed is more up-to-date covering the recently released Rails 1.2),
> but as an introduction to both Ruby and Rails as a whole it's probably
> not a bad place to start.

Thanks for adding a more experienced perspective on those books.  I'll
add some of the details of that to my store of knowledge.


> 
> Now my experience was based on first reading the 1st ed of the pickaxe
> on-line, then either the 1st ed of AWDWR or the 2nd ed of the Pickaxe
> (or the other way around), then Ruby for Rails and AWDWR 2nd ed (sort
> of in parallel).  So I don't really know what it would have been like
> to start with Ruby for Rails, any more than someone of my age knows
> what it would be like to encounter Star Wars for the first time in the
> the order Episode 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.

I imagine it would be a little disorienting, but I'm just guessing.

-- 
CCD CopyWrite Chad Perrin [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
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