On Mar 12, 2007, at 4:51 AM, John Joyce wrote:

> Let's just say that irb is worth learning to use and useful  to  
> know. It can be a lot quicker than Creating a new file, changing  
> permissions on it and executing it.

I think a lot depends on one's work habits. I have TextMate open all  
the time, but not Terminal. So it's quicker for me to evaluate  
snippets in TextMate than to open a terminal window and fire up irb.  
There is no need to set permissions to run code from TextMate.

> You can explore side effects and snippets very quickly. You can  
> even open a file's contents in irb. One thing is for sure, if you  
> have Ruby on a system, you have irb.
> While learning Ruby, irb is useful.
> TextMate is easy enough to start using, but like all good editors  
> there is a learning curve.

James Edward Gray II can be your friend here. First, there's his book  
"TextMate Power Editing for the Mac" and then there's his screencast  
"Ruby Unit Tests and More" (free download from iTunes Store -- search  
key "TextMate").

> The auto completion isn't what you might expect from a full IDE  
> like XCode or VisualWhatever.

You're right, but it works well all the same.

> But it is a good quality app with a small footprint, not demanding  
> of the system, and pretty robust.
> The cool thing is the way TextMate just implements existing OS X  
> software to do things like test run your code or validate or  
> preview pages. It's really sort of a testament to the volume of  
> good libraries in the Cocoa framework being used in ways they are  
> meant to be used.
> At first I wasn't sure if it was worth the price, but the more I  
> used it, I quickly felt it was worth more.

Regards, Morton