On Mon, Mar 12, 2007 at 04:41:09AM +0900, I. P. wrote:
> 
> Disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer.

Neither am I.


> 
> Berne Convention [2] standing as base for international copyright law
> (signed by 162 countries [3]) had defined so called "Moral Rights"
> [2.1]. This rights are independent from author's rights to sell,
> modify and so on ("economical rights") which she can pass to other
> entities.
> 
> Moral Rights are assigned automatically by the fact of creating an
> artistic work. By creating you receive right "to claim authorship of
> the work and to object to any distortion, mutilation or other
> modification <...> the said work <...>" [2.1]. This rights are
> inalienable: you can't reject to be under protection. US has neglected
> concept of inalienable Moral Rights.

Only insofar as the Berne Convention applies this concept of "Moral
Rights" to copyright law.  Considering that I reject the notion of
copyright as having anything to do with morality, I don't have a problem
with that.  Only attribution rights would qualify, in my estimation, as
being related to an "inalienable right".

-- 
CCD CopyWrite Chad Perrin [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
"The first rule of magic is simple. Don't waste your time waving your
hands and hopping when a rock or a club will do." - McCloctnick the Lucid