On Thu, Mar 08, 2007 at 04:34:21PM +0900, John Joyce wrote:
> be glad Mr. M didn't choose to make elsif in Japanese.
> It's nothing like the English. But the way Ruby methods work by being  
> appended to an object does work like a lot of Japanese grammatical  
> endings (sans the dot of course). I can't say for sure that it has  
> anything to do with that choice of syntax, but it may explain why  
> Ruby is popular in Japan. Many structures in Japanese language are  
> similar to functions but the parameter list comes before the  
> function. Learning Japanese certainly wouldn't hurt understanding  
> most programming languages.

I suspect the early popularity of Ruby in Japan had more to do with the
fact that it started there -- and the current popularity of Ruby in the
States has something to do with the fact that it finally spread far
enough to get noticed here.

In other words, its popularity in a given area probably relates to the
fact that it has finally been noticed there.  It doesn't seem to take
much to make Ruby popular.  You'd have a harder time *stopping* it from
being popular.

-- 
CCD CopyWrite Chad Perrin [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
"It's just incredible that a trillion-synapse computer could actually
spend Saturday afternoon watching a football game." - Marvin Minsky