Dave Thomas wrote:
> I love Ruby--I've done all my serious (and most of my not-so-serious) 
> work in Ruby since 2000.
> 
> But that doesn't mean that I think it's the only solution--the universal 
> language. There are always going to be areas where other tools excel.
> 
> One of those areas is concurrent programming. As the world moves to 
> multi-core processors, and as we start to write applications distributed 
> across intra- and internets, we need to find better ways to exploit all 
> this extra power. If you've ever tried to write concurrent programs in 
> Java, or even Ruby, you know the challenges.
> 
> Erlang is designed from the ground up to help programmers create highly 
> concurrently (read thousands or processes), highly reliable (read 
> 99.99999% uptime) applications. It's a real world language--it is used 
> to write telephone switches, banking applications, trading systems...you 
> name it.
> 
> I like it for that reason. I also like it because it's different--very 
> different. It makes me think about problems in a totally different way.
> 
> We were lucky to get Joe Armstrong, one of the inventors of Erlang, to 
> write our latest beta book, Programming Erlang.
> 


Sweet.  Any plans for a Haskell book?


-- 
James Britt

"The truth often suffers more by the heat of its defenders
than by the arguments of its opponents."
   - William Penn.