But many times people find Vi or emacs just as hard to learn if not
harder as an IDE.  I did at first.  Ctrl this, Alt that, how many keys
was that again?  Four!?  It was just completely alien to my brain.

I usually give my students something like SCiTe or Notepad++ to start
out with.  Keep it simple and familiar.  If you want them to focus on
the basics, then give them someting that is familiar, and as such gets
out of their way, but also makes them work harder to keep their code
formatted and working.  Not only will they appreciate IDEs/code
sensitive editors later on, they will be able to handle their editor's
quirkiness better and more intuitively.

--Jeremy

On 2/23/07, Servando Garcia <garcia.servando / gmail.com> wrote:
>
> I apologize in advance if I offend anyone on this list. My post below is
> more a rant than a question.
>
> Yes I agree that Komodo is a very nice IDE. When I am teaching programming
> one, I find that many of my students get so involved with using the lasted
> IDE ; that they lose sight of the project they should be working on. I
> suggest to my students to use either Vi or emacs to get the job done.
>
> Beginning programmers should concentrate solely on the basics of
> programming. It seems to me, that the next generation of programmers expect
> the newest and latest IDE to write the code for them. More than once a
> student has come to me with simple nesting errors that was missed by the IDE
> they were using. Each of us here as been bitten at once by the dangling
>  Else error using C++.  One of my students debated with me over this very
> problem because the IDE he was using did not catch this error.
>
>
> Come on Spring Break
>
>
>
> Sam


-- 
http://www.jeremymcanally.com/

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