On Fri, Feb 23, 2007 at 11:59:30PM +0900, Richard Conroy wrote:
> On 2/23/07, Servando Garcia <garcia.servando / gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> >I apologize in advance if I offend anyone on this list. My post below is
> >more a rant than a question.
> >
> >Yes I agree that Komodo is a very nice IDE. When I am teaching programming
> >one, I find that many of my students get so involved with using the lasted
> >IDE ; that they lose sight of the project they should be working on. I
> >suggest to my students to use either Vi or emacs to get the job done.
> >
> >Beginning programmers should concentrate solely on the basics of
> >programming.

Thanks, Richard, for quoting as plain text.  I wouldn't have responded
if the HTML email was all I had to work with.


> 
> But I recommend and even actively steer people away from IDEs. You need
> to know where files go etc. and why thats important. Programming editors
> are what you want at the start - syntax colouring, run code from editor, and
> see results in editor is what you want. Debugger would be nice in some 
> platforms
> where that is essential.

That's pretty much where I sit, too.


> 
> To all the people who learn Ruby in my sphere of influence - I say use SCiTe
> (on windows), IRB or Notepad++ (windows).

I was actually surprised to see that the OP was steering beginner
students toward vi or emacs to keep their attention on the programming
rather than the tool.  Yes, you actually see all your code in vi or
emacs, whereas you don't with an IDE -- but you also have to learn a
new, complex editing environment that is probably strange and arcane to
you if you come from a mostly GUI background (as most coders do these
days).  I love Vim, and use it for almost everything I do, but I was
surprised to read that a GUI text editor (GUI versions of Vim and emacs
don't exactly count for this case) wasn't being recommended.

SciTE is one of the best GUI code editors out there, I think.  It's
certainly my favorite.  It's also not just a Windows editor.  It's
available on Linux and FreeBSD as well (I have no idea whether it's
available for other OSes such as NetBSD, OpenBSD, or Plan 9).  In fact,
the availability of the same text editor across multiple platforms is a
major positive that cannot be claimed for certain other editors, like
Notepad++.


> 
> I am also a command-line type of guy when I am learning rails. I use RoRed
> to organise the files a bit (there are a lot - too much for a
> programming editor)
> but thats it. When I learn it, yeah I will use a big IDE that suits.

I'll probably still be using Vim for editing and bash for my file
browser when I get my Rails skills nailed down.

-- 
CCD CopyWrite Chad Perrin [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
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