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On 2/17/07, Ruben Medellin <chubas7 / gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
> That's my point: for specific questions a newbie should exhaust as many
> possibilities of solving a problem before asking to a mentor. However,
> for the learning process of any people, a good technique is to learn
> from other people's problems, hence the communities. I believe in
> collaborative learning.
>
> I agree with Aur, it can be possible to do this system and benefit the
> community by doing it an open process, with browsable search and so
> -which yields to a forum-. Or, extending the process and adopt a newbie
> for a long time, would better make a course or a tutorial.
>
> In short, I can see the benefits of this by changing the learning
> process of the newbie in question. However, it would hurt the community
> learning process. As a shy newbie myself, I can say I've learnt a lot if
> things -that are not in any manual or book- by searching and posting,
> and more important, by looking at other people's learning processes.
>
> Ruben.
>
> --
> Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
>
>
Just putting my two cents in... (or maybe a whole nickel, we'll see how
long-winded I get.)

I personally think that every newbie-mentor relationship is going to be
different.  Different people have different ways of communicating.  For me,
there are a couple of people I've found myself emailing at different points
over the last week or so.  Of course I Google for things I need help on, but
if I have a program concept, or a thought about "would it be better to do
something like this, or like that...  In this recipe (program) should I use
basil (MySql) or oregano (files as databases...)... "  And then that
generates a discussion...

I haven't gotten to a stage yet where I'm saying, I'm stuck at place X --
how do I get out of here???  I'm sure I will at some stage, at which point,
I'll probably send that to the list... I tend to censor myself as I feel I
need to.  (ie, while I know there are no stupid questions, I'd rather remain
silent and be thought a fool, than open my mouth, er move my fingers on the
keyboard, and remove all doubt.)

My # 1 rule for myself is not to take myself too seriously.  All I know is
that I'm grateful for the few people who have reached out to me and offered
to let me tap their experience and wisdom as resources, and that I'm having
a blast learning new things.  It really can't get much better than that.
(Okay, so deploying my first incredibly wonderful program would be better
than that, but ya'll know what I'm saying.)  :)
-- 
Samantha

http://www.babygeek.org/

"Beware when the great God lets loose a thinker on this planet. Then all
things are at risk."
  --Ralph Waldo Emerson

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