On Sat, Feb 03, 2007 at 07:40:06AM +0900, bbiker wrote:
> First attempt to start after bootup:
> 
> C:\Documents and Settings\Owner>fastrictl -s
> C:/ruby/bin/fastrictl.rb:68:in `start': The service did not respond to
> the start or c
> ontrol request in a timely fashion. (Win32::ServiceError)
>         from C:/ruby/bin/fastrictl.rb:68
> 
> Subsequent attempts fastrictl gets itself in an endless loop
> 
> C:\Documents and Settings\Owner>fastrictl -s
> One moment, start pending
> One moment, stopped
> One moment, stopped
> One moment, stopped
> One moment, stopped
> One moment, stopped
> C:/ruby/bin/fastrictl.rb:75:in `sleep': Interrupt
>         from C:/ruby/bin/fastrictl.rb:75

I don't really know anything about ruby-services. Dan?

> > Note that  fastri-server -B  is used to build the full-text index (which will
> > be used when you do  fri -S someterm  --- qri behaves identically to fri in
> > this case), so you probably meant  fastri-server -b.
> 
> No. I usually do  "fastri-server -B" after I install new gems.
> 
> For where I stand (ignorance), I thought that -B was more thorough job than
> -b although it takes longer to do the indexing. It also appears to rebuild
> the index.
>
> It has not been made clear when one should one over the over
> 
> I do use "fri -S someterm" or "qri -S someterm" ,,, just "fri
> someterm" or "qri someterm"
> 
> (just did "qri -S" ...  now I know ... will investigate to learn the
> difference between "qri someterm" and "qri -S someterm"

qri/fri -S performs full-text searching against the index built with
fastri-server -B, so the query term is looked for in the whole ri
documentation. Therefore,  qri -S test  will return all the method/class
descriptions containing "test". You can think of it as a Fgrep over all your
RDocs, the main difference being that it'll find the docs in a few
milliseconds... (also, qri -S test Rails  will only return documents whose
text matches both 'test' _and_ 'Rails').

fri/qri without -S try to match "document titles" (class/method names)
according to the search strategy specified with -O (see fri -h for details).

If you know what you're looking for, there's no need for -S; if you don't, -S
can be useful. For example, if you're having endianness problems and don't
know what to use,

    $ fri -S byte -T order 
    7 hits
    ========================================================================
    0.400320384512718
    Found in system  Array#pack

    ...      v     |  Short, little-endian byte order
    ...      E     |  Double-precision float, little-endian byte order
    ...   |  Double-precision float, network (big-endian) byte order
    ...      G     |  Double-precision float, network (big-endian) byte
    [...]

    ========================================================================
    0.377964473009227
    Found in facets 1.4.5  BinaryReader#byte_order

    ... default is native byte-order
    [...]
    ========================================================================
    0.235294117647059
    Found in system  String#unpack

    ...           |         | a float in little-endian byte order
    ...           |         | a double in little-endian byte order
    ...           |         | short in little-endian byte order
    ...           |         | short in network byte order
    ...           |         | float in network byte order
    ...           |         | long in network byte order
    ...           |         | a double in network byte order
    ...           |         | long in little-endian byte order
    ...           |         | short in native byte order
    ...           |         | in native byte order
    [...]


> I have just removed the "puts yamlfile #{yamlfile}"  line from fastri-
> server.rb
> 
> fastri-server -B  terminates with:
> 
> C:/ruby/bin/fastri-server.rb:71: [BUG] Segmentation fault
> ruby 1.8.5 (2006-12-25) [i386-mswin32]

Alright, we have pure-Ruby code and an intermittent bug which disappears when
you add or remove code that shouldn't change anything. For a long time, I've
blamed syck when this happened to me, and have often been right :-| The
standard procedure to follow is finding a way to reproduce it, submitting to
ruby-core and hoping somebody will find the culprit. I'm trying to have ruby
crash locally but it doesn't want to...

-- 
Mauricio Fernandez  -   http://eigenclass.org   -  singular Ruby