On Jan 30, 9:08 am, "gregarican" <greg.kuj... / gmail.com> wrote:
> I would agree with this, as this is one of the first books I used to
> get started learning Ruby. These SAMS books are great. For learning
> other progrmaming languages as well. Due to upcoming business
> requirements I needed to delve into C# and found that SAMS book
> helpful as well. They are quick reads, give you enough info to get
> started, without overwhelming you with too much info and putting you
> to sleep. Once you do get your feet wet with Ruby I would recommend
> "The Ruby Way", which now has an updated second edition. The first
> edition helped me understand how to best leverage Ruby by
> understanding the whys more than the hows that I first understood.
> Kind of like learning Smalltalk. It's an easy language to learn how to
> do things. But to learn why to do things a certain way gets you more
> productive and more in-tune with getting the most out of your time.
>
> On Jan 29, 2:53 pm, Rodrigo Bermejo <rodrigo.berm... / ps.ge.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> >Raewrote:
> > > Is there a book like programming Ruby for dummies or other such
> > > elementary learning tool?
> > > Can someone recommend some really basic beginner books for Ruby? One
> > > that would include the software and other tools you need to make a
> > > program? I see a lot of code examples on the various tutorial sites
> > > but nothing really on what programs you need to make a Ruby program.
> > > What software I'd need to buy or hopefully download free. I have
> > > FreeRide and some java programs and Netbeans (which apparantly doesn't
> > > work with .rb files)
>
> > > I'm more interested in creating a web with Ruby on Rails but was told
> > > I need to learn Ruby first.
>
> > > thanks,
>
> > > RaeLearning ruby in 21 Days - SAM's
> > Is a good starting point
>
> > --
> > Posted viahttp://www.ruby-forum.com/.-Hide quoted text -- Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Thanks to all who responded. I'll look into all of these.
much appreciated.
Rae