Hi everyone,

I think I got a solution but I am not sure...can I post answers for
toothpick expressions for numbers 10 to 35 so that I can check whether
I get minimum toothpick counts?

Best regards,

Andrey Falko


On 1/26/07, Ruby Quiz <james / grayproductions.net> wrote:
> The three rules of Ruby Quiz:
>
> 1.  Please do not post any solutions or spoiler discussion for this quiz until
> 48 hours have passed from the time on this message.
>
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> 3.  Enjoy!
>
> Suggestion:  A [QUIZ] in the subject of emails about the problem helps everyone
> on Ruby Talk follow the discussion.  Please reply to the original quiz message,
> if you can.
>
> -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
>
> This quiz was adapted from an ACM programming challenge at the suggestion of
> Gavin Kistner.
>
> Simple math can be done with toothpicks alone.  Positive integers are just a
> count of toothpicks so three becomes |||.  We can use two toothpicks together to
> build a plus sign (+) or even tilt those slightly to get a multiplication
> operator (x).  Putting all of that together, the expression ||x||||+| is another
> way to express the number nine.
>
> This weeks quiz is to write a program that takes a single command-line argument
> which will be a positive integer.  Your code should build a toothpick expression
> to calculate the number using as few toothpicks as possible.  For example:
>
>         $ruby toothpick.rb 9
>         |||x||| = 9 (8 toothpicks)
>
> Don't forget to count those operators!
>
> Posting toothpick expressions and/or counts for a given number is not spoiler
> material.
>
>