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I also started with text.

Wrote text games and other fun stuff.

But the REAL joy came when we discovered the BASIC LINE command.

And with my sister, which was/is less of a gekk pre-programming-lessons, I
could never get her interested in writing text games and fun things
involving text (my generation of programmers will ALLWAYS remember the
famous rocket ascii animation).

When I taught her "paper logo" (I just took a piece of paper and taught her
LOGO commands, drawing them on the paper when executing) she got really
interested and not only did what I asked her to but thought a lot forward
(she proposed variables and named procedures herself, after only about half
an hour of polygon drawing).

Graphics are, in my opinion, the most "fun" kind of artistic programming,
and the one where nice results are the simplest to get (and also, one where
advanced programming yields even better results, see for example fractals or
the amazing demos a pascal teacher I had showed us, with a 3D flaming ball
or a waving flag...).

Aur Saraf

On 1/25/07, Martin DeMello <martindemello / gmail.com> wrote:
>
> On 1/25/07, SonOfLilit <sonoflilit / gmail.com> wrote:
> > By the way, may I suggest a lesson learned from years of trying to teach
> my
> > sister programming:
> >
> > Graphics BEFORE number crunching and text processing.
>
> When I taught my brother to program, I started with text i/o. He had
> great fun writing little quiz programs (ask a question, present a few
> choices, wait for an answer, repeat), unit conversion programs, etc.
> Text is more interactive than graphics that way.
>
> martin
>
>

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