Emiliano wrote:

>> *That's* when refactoring comes in handy.  Even if the worst programming
>> constructs were avoided (because they were impossible), the best solution
>> is often to re-write the code.
> 
> Unfortunately, there's often no budget for refacturing.

Good lord!  Are you serious?  Refactoring shouldn't something you budget 
for; it should be a standard part of the development process.  Heck, 
sometimes I refactor stuff that works perfectly well.  ;-)

> The Netherlands, to be exact. I can't be sure whether it's sufficient,
> but I've been told you can probably get permission to fire someone if he's

Heh.  Germany was like that, too.  Dang socialism.

Personally, I think the downsides of that are more than offset by the 
upsides.  In America, we have no job security, unless you work for the 
govornment.  Bang, you're laid off, no warning.  I think our way often puts 
the health of companies ahead of the health of individuals, which I don't 
approve of.

> That can be a real problem here. Although I must say that I'm

What, training people in problematic?

> Heck, most people even go to the Visual Basic and Software Process
> Improvement courses voluntarily.

<shudder> You're infected with VB, too?  Oh my.

> Errrr..... OK, so you got me here. But sometimes 'inflexibility' (or
> as it is known in its weaker form, 'stability') can be good.

Yeah, I agree.  Stability is having the option to change, but not choosing 
it.  Inflexibility is not having the option.

--- SER


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