Python and Ruby both are write/read scripting languages, which are in one or
the other way "pragmatic" and rather similar.

A language is pragmatic if the language itself is pragmatic and there are
tools existing supporting it. This applies to Python, but yet not to Ruby.

When there's an IDE available for Ruby with visual debugger support (Black
Adder is very promising in this regard, but is itself beta now for 2 or more
years; Komodo will be there first probably), I'll give Ruby a *real* try
("Always step thru your code", you know...).

I tried Ruby for several times now (since end of 2000), but I simply am not
one of those, who's able to program within an ASCII editor, doing all
debugging by scattering all those prints or puts' onto my code. I even found
programming Perl tolerable when I discovered that there is a possibility to
start-up a visual debugger.

What about the language itself? Well, I find Ruby's blocks appealing, but
can't say much more yet. When I will have worked more than 45 minutes ;-)
with Ruby, I can say more, until then I cannot.

Anyway, languages are tools. And any programmer should have more than one
tool in his bag of tools. So you'll not find me fighting language wars.
You'll find me using languages, not fighting for them or against them.

Best regards
Franz GEIGER


"Dave Thomas" <Dave / PragmaticProgrammer.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:m2pu7buj3k.fsf / zip.local.thomases.com...
>
> I want to start out with a statement: this is not a message about
> which language is better. Instead, I'm trying to clarify some vague
> thought I have by seeing if anyone else can explain it :)
>
> For me personally, Ruby and Python have different characters. It isn't
> that one is better that the other in any absolute sense: they just
> feel different when I use them. From talking with folks, this seems to
> be a common experience.
>
> So, here's my question. As Paul Prescod has said, Ruby and Python are
> fairly similar in many significant ways. Despite this, I personally
> have never managed to get excited about Python, but liked Ruby so much
> I wrote a book about it. Other folks have the opposite experience,
> loving Python and not finding much to thrill them about Ruby. Why is
> that? Is it some kind of personality clash between the language and
> the programmer? Is it liking what you're used to? Is it liking or
> disliking the philosophies of the languages' designers? Or is it
> something else?
>
> I have some very vague idea of what it might be (at least as far as
> I'm concerned), but I'd like to see what people think before posting
> it.
>
>
> Cheers
>
>
> Dave
>
>