This is how Tcl/Tk is designed, and it works very well.  For a long time it
was by far the best GUI toolkit, and it's a shame Sun didn't take some of
the ideas on board for the AWT and Swing.

Cheers,
        Nat.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Rich Kilmer" <rich / infoether.com>
To: "ruby-talk ML" <ruby-talk / ruby-lang.org>
Sent: Thursday, October 25, 2001 10:19 PM
Subject: [ruby-talk:23355] Re: GUI / was [ANN] RubyInRubyParser
0.1-pre-alpha


I wrote a sophisticated lightweight component framework on Java (before
Swing) that was very fast.  Of course, writing it in a "higher level"
language adds overhead, but not as much overhead as bad design ;-)  If you
could have low-level primitives written natively and layer higher level
constructs with Ruby, I think you could build a very responsive UI.

-Rich

> -----Original Message-----
> From: markus liedl [mailto:markus.lado / gmx.de]
> Sent: Thursday, October 25, 2001 4:23 PM
> To: ruby-talk ML
> Subject: [ruby-talk:23350] Re: GUI / was [ANN] RubyInRubyParser
> 0.1-pre-alpha
>
>
> > having a native window with a canvas which Ruby draws on using
> the BitBlt
> > operation.  From there we can think about a GUI toolkit like
> Squeak's, and
> > other things like that.
>
> matju, and experiences with Java Swing will tell you that this solution is
> not fast, and will never be. I was surprised, but Swings slowness does not
> depend on the hardware it runs one, it's just slow. (I have
> impressions from
> using Swing on a k6-2 350,  P3 650, athlon 1.4)
>
> matju's ideas say: get compatibility by the X11 protocol ( which
> may not be
> what windows-guys like).
>
> It's waste of time to copy Java Swing for Ruby.
>
> Surely, it's a nice occassion for you to learn how a certain chip on your
> graphic card is doing BitBlts, but for serious work, let it do this chip.
>
> markus
>
> --
> -------------------------------------------------
>
>
>
>
>
>