There was one case I remember where a Success Stories page really got
me interested in something:

The Franz Lisp success stories, including the Crash Bandicoot series
of games (and the Jak & Daxter series, but I've never played those, so
it struck me less), modified immediately my view of Lisp from 'a
language only applicable for data structure crunching' (i.e. almost no
communication with the "outside world" of other software on the
computer/net) to 'a dynamic language on par with C in performance with
much higher abstraction that can be used for graphical things, even 3d
computer games'.

So yes, Success Stories pages do have use.

But I don't think the correct attitude of such a page is to show that
"here, this was used where money was involved, so don't be afraid to
put yours behind it". but to show scales and domains of projects that
the language was a factor in making possible that the average reader
possibly thought are impossible with it.

Show a huge project, a fast project (with C in the right places, of
course). a complicated algorithmic project, a beautiful graphic
application, projects that really USE ruby tlike Rails, show camping.
I think camping deserves a special place in such a page because it is
very RUBY, wouldn't possibly be able to achieve in the same way with
another language, and is so damn ELEGANT. Also, code USING camping is
so elegant for having a whole website written in 100% ruby deployable
as a single .rb file.

On 1/7/07, James Britt <james.britt / gmail.com> wrote:
> M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:
>
> > Again, I think Ruby advocacy has value, as does something like a
> > "marketing plan". Whatever you think about Rails, Rails hype and the
> > possibly unrealistic expectations it has set, it did get attention in an
> > age when attention is a very scarce commodity. And the Rails community
> > is *not* shy about their success stories, and I don't think we should be
> > either.
> >
>
> On the other hand, I know people who, somehow or another, got the
> impression that Ruby on Rails was the One True Path to Effortless
> Productivity.   After some initial success with basic things, they hit a
> wall, and became disillusioned.
>
> That's when PHP starts looking more and more appealing.
>
>
> --
> James Britt
>
> "Tear it up and start again."
>   - Anonymous
>
>