>
> See rubyforge.org
>

True, and I'm sure a number of people have gone that route.  But again
we come back to the economics of time. ;)

> When I started with Ruby in 2001 or so, I was coding Java, and some
> Perl.  There's no way I would have tried to get Ruby into a prime-time
> slot without more experience.  I was working at a company were tech
> leads were paid lip service, and J2EE rules the day (partly due, I
> think, to superficial "success stories" claiming vast gains).
>
> So I started using Ruby for whatever I could think of that would be fun
> and interesting, on my own time.
>
> I left that job by the end of the year.  I realize not everyone has that
> option, but I knew that the company was not one of the things I had the
> power to change, and life's too short to sit a cube and be bored.
>

That's awesome; I really wish that I had had that option, but other
ties keep me in place.

>
> Of course; I'm in the same boat  But I'm skeptical that it is the role
> of ruby-lang.org to help people get work.
>
> A year or two ago, Curt Hibbs started a "Why Ruby?" project on
> rubyforge.org.  It was largely a collection of presentations meant to
> explain essential features of Ruby to developers and/or managers.
>
> That collection was eventually moved over to ruby-doc.org.  It's pretty
> much remained unchanged since then.  If Ruby advocacy is a useful
> pursuit, it may be better served by its own site run by people with the
> time and motivation to look after it.
>

Well, I didnt mean to make it sound like people could/should use it to
get work.

My point about the success stories is this: They're a short, effective
way to curry interest and instill even a little trust in Ruby.  That
is the job of the main website I think, and something that can be
easily server by this page. :)

--Jeremy

-- 
My free Ruby e-book:
http://www.humblelittlerubybook.com/book/

My blogs:
http://www.mrneighborly.com/
http://www.rubyinpractice.com/