Trans wrote:
> I was a bit surprised about Matz mention of the little things in his
> last <a
> href="http://www.rubyist.net/~matz/slides/rc2006/mgp00017.html">ketynote</a>.
> Little things can make all the difference! In fact, long time Rubyists
> have been waiting a long for some important "little" things. Here's
> some of the things on my little list....

First off great discussion and thank you kindly for posting the link! 
Ironically, your first point about the discussion of the little things 
vs Mat'z "the need for speed" has mostly gone untouched.  I believe Matz 
has brought up some excellent points in that slide show and that was the 
first time I noticed his sense of urgency in getting the ball rolling on 
1.9.

I should note before continuiing that I know nothing of the progress of 
1.9 and haven't contributed in any way but like most am anxiously 
looking forward to it!

My belief from reading that slide show is that the core team must be 
getting hounded with suggestions, observations, complaints, etc... and 
this is causing some considerable lag and frustration in it's life cycle 
and this is a cry by the lead saying "Enough is enough!"  I think he is 
absolutely right, his team needs to push this thing out and then 
formalize the process of change.  IMO, they are pretty much forced to 
accept a formalized process for change requests as there is now a lot of 
momentum behind the language.  I believe this is a key milestone for 
Ruby hitting the big time.

I also really like his definition of Ruby as an "Agile" language!  This 
is a perfect definition and it seems so obvious after his statement.

As for the concerns over documentation, I believe it's need is too much 
hyped about.  Ruby is very intuitive by design and due to IRB and 
metaprogramming, most of what one needs can be retreived quite easily 
after reading a book or 2 and by coming here as I often do  :)

He is not saying that we should stop talking about the little things, 
but that we must concentrate on the big things in order that we keep up 
and have a platform in which to add the little things later.  A possible 
analogy is a story I heard a few years back.

A professor placed a container on his desk and then proceeded to put 
rocks into it, he continually placed smaller and smaller rocks into the 
container as space would allow and then finally filled the remaining 
space with sand.  He then asked what the class learned from this 
experiment.

One student exclaimed that the experiment simply showed that we can 
always strive to fit more in.

The professor corrected the student and explained that if we don't do 
the big things first, they will never be completed after perfoming all 
the small things.


ilan

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