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On 12/27/06, David Vallner <david / vallner.net> wrote:
>
> It's probably a reference to the huge number of Java and PHP expats Ruby
> has attracted recently. (Though that seems to have shifted to GUI
> programmers and Windows automation people recently. The former might
> have something to do with the Ajax hype receding, the latter seems to be
> a stable base of relatively nontechnical users.)
>
> David Vallner


Or maybe the latter has to do with a bunch of people who understand some
basic programming concepts, who just don't want to learn the syntax crap
that comes with java.  After 2 hours troubleshooting an error in a java
program that turned out to be me typing double in one place and Double in
another, I gave up on that language.  The language shouldn't get in the way
of programming - which is why I got into Ruby.  After reading the preface of
the pickaxe I was sold on Ruby.  The phrase "creating solutions for your
users, not for the compiler" in the second edition of the pickaxe says it
more eloquently than I ever could.

The simple fact is that someone might be very technical in several areas of
computers and have little to no experience with programming other than
figuring out where the bugs and bad logic are (I'm thinking about the
penetration testers out there without much higher level programming
experience).  What I use Ruby for is GUI programming and Windows
automation... but calling me a relatively nontechnical user rankles me.  I'm
the guy that does the troubleshooting on a programmer's PC when they can't
get it to work.  Right now I'm trying to automate my job - it's a science,
it's not magic.

Anyway, I'm pretty sure Trans meant for it to be a joke.  Laugh, it was
funny.

J

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