M. Edward (Ed) Borasky ha escrito:

> Sebastian wrote:
> > On 2006-12-11 20:24:37 -0600, Kerry Stevenson <nobody / nowhere.com> said:
> >
> >> I am wondering if there is a Ruby resource (book, web pages, whatever)
> >> that would be suitable to teach a child who has never programmed
> >> anything before.  The pickaxe book, while a terrific resource, seems to
> >> assume at least some basic knowledge of programming and language
> >> syntax.
> >
> > "Learn To Progam"[1] from the Pragmatic Programmers might be a good
> > fit. While not specifically a Ruby book per se, it uses Ruby examples
> > to teach programming basics.
> >
> > Sebastian
> >
> > [1] http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/titles/fr_ltp/index.html
> How young are we talking here? I'm sure we've covered this adequately,
> but for elementary school "kids" I'd recommend Logo over Ruby. But once
> we are talking early teens, Ruby is probably a good choice, and "Learn
> To Program" is probably not going to tax them too badly. I think I could
> have handled "Learn To Program" at 13. Of course, I was earning my
> living as a programmer when I was 19, so I may have been atypical. :)
>

For what it is worth, I'd recommend just Ruby and "Learn to Program" as
excellent from the excerpts I just read.
As a background: I learned programming as a kid and I *DID* try Logo
which I found extremely frustrating and limiting (this was in primary
school, age 8 or so) compared to BASIC, which I had already learned on
my own.  The kidslanguage someone else suggested is BASIC, done
Microsoft style, which is WAY too verbose compared to ruby.

Now, one of the most boring things about programming books is that they
have exercises and those exercises are usually plainly boring.

To keep a kid interesting in programming.... one sure thing will do it:
games.  The cooler, the better.

My suggestion:

Download SDL/OpenGL for ruby.  I'm sure you'll be able to find some
games for them somewhere.  Do NOT show the game to your kid.  Now, I'll
tell what to do with it.   But I'll tell you why first...

The way I learned how to code was by typing in code taken from
magazines which contained games written in BASIC (there, I just dated
myself :), as you could not buy software in my time where I lived, but
you could buy magazines that had code in them.
You can obviously not do that now, but you CAN download some games, go
through their source code and introduce some bugs in them.  Then give
them to your kid to fix the code.
Not only will he learn how to debug code (and learn how to program in
the process), but he'll love it, as in the end he'll have a working
game to entertain himself with.

As for web stuff... ruby can do it and WAY better than PHP.  Your kid
won't miss it.