Hi Kent,

	we produced a few simply slides (recyling heavily
from that mailing list & matz's slides (JAOO). 

Our slides are not really an introduction .. they were more
a bit of information about Ruby with some small examples.
http://www.approximity.com/ruby/

If you want the StarOffice source to edit directly, email me.

The 1st thing that springs into mind as a very short
introduction might be:
http://www.ruby-lang.org/~slagell/

If your student's are Java programmers, maybe a short
5 to 10 page documentation with a Java program
next to the Ruby equivalent might be all they need
to get going. 

Maybe try to get the "Ruby-Way" across.
(there's a page about that on www.rubygarden.org)

Judging from my own time back at university -- the
most impart thing are interesting coding assignements
and if possible have a human person actually look
and comment on the code.. or at least get elegant
solutions for the parts that really matter. As students
do not look at handed-out solutions later, try to include
them in the next assignement to make sure people
pick up the gems.
I did end up doing tons of different projects nearly always
in a different language (learn it yourself), which was good
as you get a good overview, but the feedback to really
become an expert was missing too often.. it was much more
by us students working together and discussing our solutions
that we started to grasp the deeper issues of the specific
languages.. grab a guru that knows!

I'm not sure it is best to write all in Ruby, i.e. use plain
English from time to time, too.. it leaves your notes
much easier to read.

Hope this helps a bit & let us hear how your course goes.
	Armin

we used at a talk 
On Sunday 21 October 2001 13:08, Kent Dahl wrote:
> Hi.
>
> Despite my still quite ruby-newbie status, I've volunteered to hold a
> introductory course in Ruby for computer-enthusiastic students
> (www.pvv.org) at my university next year, to spread the gospel.
>
> I've started to look around on online tutorials, presentations etc for
> input, and I've started bouncing ideas around my head.
>
> ______________________
> #1: Paper documents
>
> When I first followed a Python course thru the PVV, one of the things
> that I've kept is the printed up material provided at the course. As
> much as the wonderful book by Thomas and Hunt is on the web, I believe
> that the "hands on" material newbies get is very important to keep them
> interested until they buy a book.
> 	The Python course material was basically the Python Quick Reference +
> overheads from the course itself. Despite the chaotic nature of the
> quick ref, I've kept it and dug it out every time I've done semi-serious
> with Python.
> 	Are there any quick overview documents similar in nature to the Python
> Quick Reference ( http://www.brunningonline.net/simon/python/PQR.html )
> that can be printed easily and legally? (Not that Ruby needs it as much,
> of course ;-)
>
> ______________________
> #2: Similar work...
>
> The goal of the course, is to try to grab the students that are
> relatively new to programming and have just started learning Java here
> at university, and also catering to the more seasoned hackers who want
> to try a bite of Ruby.
> 	I've been looking around abit on tutorials, presentation etc for
> inspiration and ideas where to begin, but I haven't yet seen anything
> that addresses a similar audience.
>
> ______________________
> #3: Advertising
>
> A while back there was some posts on a "motto" for Ruby, and various
> slogans... "Human-Oriented Programming" and such.
> 	I was hoping to combine one of the logos and a motto or slogan into
> something more eye-catching and ensnaring than the usual
> programming-course posters here at univ. Anyone tried something like
> this? (And yes, I'll try to avoid succumbing to using Ruby-chan...)
>
> My first efforts go towards a "telepathic" theme, with a face outline
> and computer outline face-to-screen, with interjoined thought and speak
> bubbles. Standard PR tricks with emphasising the words "telepathy",
> "computer" and "you" in a sentence below stating "Telepathy between your
> computer and you is not yet possible, but with Ruby you come close to
> talking the same language as your computer than ever before." ... but
> this may be too geeky.
> 	I'll bounce other "propaganda poster" ideas here, in search of
> constructive critique.
>
> ______________________
> #4: Syntax Colouring
>
> Now I know of ruby-mode.el for Emacs, but I was wondering if there are
> any tools for making syntax coloured HTML of Ruby code? (Doesn't need to
> be HTML either, any commonly supported format would be nice)
> ....I don't like having to relying too much on the facilities where I
> hold presentations, so ruby-mode.el won't do the trick.
>
> ______________________
> #5: Readability gimmick
>
> I have this overwhelming inclination of writing the entire presentation
> in Ruby to show its readability.
> 	Ruby.is_a?( ScriptingLanguage )
> 	Ruby.is_a?( ObjectOrientedLanguage )
> 	Ruby.learned_from( SmallTalk )
> Please hit me over the head with why that is a bad idea...
>
> .... any input appreciated ...

-- 
Armin.

-----------------------------------------------
Armin Roehrl, http://www.approximity.com
"The best way to predict the future is to invent it."
                                          --Alan Kay