Zouplaz wrote:

/ ...

>> For the other readers, GraForth was a Forth embodiment I cooked up about
>> 25 years ago, at a time when most things were written in assembly. It
>> supported a kind of graphics that would be embarrassingly crude by modern
>> standards.
>> 
> 
> Hey ! I remember a demo of GraForth showing a 3D rotating cube (maybe
> color filled)

How ironic that you should mention that. I was recently deposed by a group
of lawyers defending all the big game-software players (Microsoft,
Nintendo, et.al.) against a patent lawsuit that claimed they had patented
the idea of using a joystick or keyboard to control an onscreen 3D graphics
display. If they had prevailed in their claim, it would have been a gold
mine.

MIllions of dollars of royalties were at stake. Then a researcher discovered
I had written GraForth and an earlier program called Apple World that did
what the patent claimed, before the date of the patent. Basically my
testimony took the wind out of their sails.

> - Not that bad for the only mhz of my Apple IIc (no I 
> didn't had that wonderful II+, I was a little late)
> 
>> It was basically a way to get around the fact that there were almost no
>> high-level languages, and none that mere mortals could either afford or
>> support with the small HDD and RAM sizes of the era.
> 
> Did you used any cross compilation systems to code GraForth or
> AppleWriter ? (you know that kind of systems that most early 80s teen
> geek dreamed to have an access onto)

GraForth, yes, Apple Writer, no. I ported GraForth over to the early IBM PC,
but Apple Writer was mired in assembly language. I had to completely
rewrite Apple Writer for the PC (under a different name, of course) because
it was plain assembly, no abstractions. GraForth was, after all, Forth, so
it was more portable.

-- 
Paul Lutus
http://www.arachnoid.com