I would say Ruby is a viable corporate alternative. It has cut down my
development time by a factor of ten, for web services and web apps
(using Rails). I would not like to touch Java again.

Your Java/C++ cadre are probably the late adopters who said the same
thing about Java when it came out. I would try to not let them hold me
back ... Java's 'strong' point now I would say is in web apps, that's
where I seem to see it being used most AFAICT.

Linux Journal just gave their Editor's Choice (from another thread on
this list) to Rails for web app framework and to Ruby for language.

  http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/9368

I think the trick is to get into stuff early but not *too* early - and
to ignore the laggards since they will always be there, any way. If
they want to write huge amounts of code, that's fine with me, but
hopefully they are on their own team and can slog as much as they want
while wiser people save time and finish early.

-- G.

On 11/28/06, Mr P <MisterPerl / gmail.com> wrote:
> Our team uses Perl for almost 100% of our projects, as we have for the
> past 10 year or so. At that point we broke from the C/C++ herd and
> never looked back. Our productivity has been the best in the
> corporation since, and we hear nothing but complaints and bad-mouthing
> from the Java/C++ cadre since their design and  implementations are
> typically 5-10X what ours are..
>
> Anyhow- as the team director, I'm always *looking ahead*. Although Perl
> is still serving us well, I'm thinking for the benefit of our
> developers ( to get more languages in their personal toolkit ) as well
> as making productivity improvements through OO design and the ruby
> environment, I'm starting to talk up and promote Ruby as the NEXT
> language.
>
> This REALLY set off a firestorm from the Java folks, They are already
> they are trying to undermine us with comments like:
>
> o you'll never find any developers to support it, there are almost none
> in the USA
>
> o you won't like anything that comes out of Japan (this comment from a
> country that was conquered by Japan and still harbors a lot of
> resentment, so I sort of discounted that comment! )
>
> o its not gaining popularity and will probably die out
>
> o might as well just use Java
>
> ... and so on..
>
> Anyhow, if you all can provide me with websites on Ruby stats vis-a-vis
> other languages, trends, successes, etc., I'd like to go into this
> battle armed!  The break from the herd 10 years ago was very
> productive, and my impression is that Ruby would have similar results.
>
>
>