tx a lot 4 the feedback. sounds good

On Sun, 19 Nov 2006 16:44:57 +0900, Mike Shock wrote:

> Hi!
> As a developer who wrote programs in C++ & Java & Ruby and as a man who 
> trained young programmers,
> I surely recommend Ruby for a newbie :-)
> 
> If you're a beginner it's certainly better to have the fastest startup 
> with some OO language - and Ruby here is the best choice:
> it's easy to learn and it suggests the 'proper' way of OO thinking.
> It's more important first to get more experience in  OO design and 
> programming, leaving for the future your thoughts of possible app's low 
> speed...
> After a while you may want to learn Java or / and C++ ('cause a 
> programmer have to know more than 1 language) 
> and with happy Ruby experience it'll be much easier.
> 
> The questions of speed and efficiency of financial / economical 
> applications should be treated from the point of view
> of the architecture & framework, not merely the programming language - 
> considering all the DBMS, client-server and Web-interface stuff.
> Ruby on Rails offers a fine solution for database-centric applications.
> 
> Mike Shock
> (Mikhail Shokhirev)
> 
> n/a wrote:
>> hi, newbie so please be tolerant.... ;)
>>
>> i need to start to learn a programming language to be able to develop
>> custom aps to be applied to a variety of purposes but mainly 1) financial
>> data modeling--including graphics and data handling via database queries,
>> etc.; and 2) more general business-type aps.
>>
>> my feeling is that i hate BLOATED sluggish programs (like some Java
>> program running on older JVM's and perhaps not written in an optimal
>> way....u get the idea.)
>>
>> if i need to make a choice between fancy and efficient,
>> speed, etc., then it's an easy choice 4 me of efficient.
>> which is why i have just started w/ c++.
>>
>>   
>> however, speaking to one my programmer friends who is a top level Java
>> programmer (the stuff he writes is very efficient and fancy as
>> well--great balance), he is telling me that 1) c++ is being phased out
>> (except 4 real low level stuff like drivers, etc.) in favor of languages
>> such as Java or Ruby. he recommends i switch from learning c++ to learning
>> Java or Ruby. i wd hope to be able to choose the best path and not have to
>> switch tack in the middle as my IT capablity is not a full time activity,
>> but more of a support 4 my main one--finance.
>>
>> of course, learning curve is to be taken into consideration as well....
>>
>> 'd love some comments that might help me consider my options and pick a
>> path (c++, java or ruby) w/ a higher level of confidence..... i know that
>> people here will be biased towards Ruby, but that is fine: i want to hear
>> about it....
>>
>>