On 10 Nov 2006, at 14:23, Leslie Viljoen wrote:

> On 11/10/06, Peter Hickman <peter / semantico.com> wrote:
>> Leslie Viljoen wrote:
>> > I have the deciding vote in a new (rather large) web app we need to
>> > develop. I am experienced in Rails, but the other 2 guys on the  
>> team
>> > know only C# and very basic Ruby. About 25% of the app could  
>> benefit
>> > from existing classes written in C#.
>>
>> Well you could sell it as a good CV move for them. In the end they  
>> will
>> know C# and Ruby and Rails. Got to be a good thing if they ever  
>> want to
>> move.
>>
>> If you already have C# I'm not too sure of the value of adding  
>> ASP.NET
>> to your CV.
>
> I think so, although in the backwater of South Africa, very few people
> have ever heard of Ruby or Rails! I have yet to see a single book here
> on either subject.

All I can say is that you're not looking at my bookshelf :) From  
where I sit in my South African backwater of a study, I see two Ruby  
books, plus a PDF or two. In my work environment, most people have  
heard of Ruby and Rails. Most view Rails with a certain scepticism,  
especially given that we do most of our work in Java. Looking at the  
scary complexity of many of the apps we produce for our customers, I  
can see why Rails, with it's "constraints are good" philosophy, may  
not be the best framework for every Web app. I must admit that I  
haven't done much work in Rails, but for me Ruby itself is a  
beautiful, elegant language that is a joy to program in.

Nithia