On Thu, 9 Nov 2006, skt wrote:

> Once again, I think you all kindly for your quick response to my "quick"
> question.
> I need to be patient, but for me it's all or nothing. I WANT to learn this,
> but these frustrating little roadblocks are driving me crazy.
> 
> I understand you can define them as self as well?
> example
> def self(username, pass, etc, etc)

You have just defined a method called self.  This will confuse
the heck out of you later: self refers to the current "instance"
and is often left out in Ruby code.  It is an object, not a method.
Basically, don't do that.

> > Alright, can somebody point me to a guide that doesn't leave me all
> > > kinds of confused?
> > > For instance.
> > > def thingHere(self, params)

In Python and some other languages you make the first parameter of a 
method refer to the object.  You don't need to do that in Ruby.

> > > @params = so and so

@params = params
would be the Ruby idiom here. Set the "instance variable" value to the
supplied parameter.

@params is an "instance variable" -- a variable that lives inside
each instance.  If you read up on Object Orientation you will find
things about "Has-A" and "Is-A" relationships.  An object "Is-A"
Type (which for Ruby is more than just it's class, because
individual objects can be modified -- see the stuff on Duck Typing
when you are ready to know that level of detail.)  But in the simple
cases an Object "Is-A" Whatever-its-class-is.  However, an object
"Has-A" instance variable, or it has more than one.

My friend's car Is-A Nissan Micra.  It Has-A steering wheel, but
then it Is-A Car, and all Cars have one.  (A class is an object and
it can be substituted for its parent class. A Human Is-A Mammal, etc.)

        Hugh