That was the most amusing email I've read all day. Thank you, that made me 
feel about 300 times more confident.

Naturally I think a major part of my problem is I'm trying TOO hard to 
become a programmer and not enough time focusing on the basics. I've read 
several other pieces of code, and scripts and thought "well hey i can do 
that." which I guess is probably not the best way to go about it.

I AM learning, I mean I guess at least a little bit. But it feels like it's 
taking me a really long time to retain.

Well thanks for the welcome, I'm sure I'll get it Im just frustrated that 
I'm not getting it right away.

Skt
Webpage (www.freewebs.com/scottygiveshighfives)
Email: Shyguyfrenzy / gmail.com
(That's a mario reference.)

You sing a new song, unsung.
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "James Edward Gray II" <james / grayproductions.net>
To: "ruby-talk ML" <ruby-talk / ruby-lang.org>
Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2006 11:34 AM
Subject: Re: Just a question to throw out there...


> On Nov 2, 2006, at 12:23 PM, Skotty wrote:
>
>> Another noobrube question.
>>
>> Is this the "easiest" language to learn? I'm well aware that none  of 
>> these programming languages are "easy" but I've been struggling  with 
>> this for a while and don't want to give up.
>>
>> Or is there something else I should know first BEFORE going to  Ruby? 
>> Why's guide is a biggggg help but I don't know why I can't  retain this 
>> information.
>>
>> Any help guides?
>> Anything?
>
> There was a fun side conversation on this at RubyConf this year. 
> Basically, you need to know this:  Computers are really, really  stupid. 
> ;)
>
> Don't buy that?  Try this exercise:
>
>   Make up a random number.
>
> You had no trouble doing that, right?  Well congratulations, because  you 
> just leap ahead of about 30 years of computer research in a few  seconds. 
> ;)
>
> Obviously, I'm being flippant here, but the point stands.  Learning  to 
> program is hard because you need to dumb yourself down to the  level of 
> the machine and express problems in terms it can understand.
>
> Did you ever play that game in school where you had to tell your  teacher 
> how to make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich?  You write up  what you 
> just know are excellent instructions and as you read them  the teacher 
> makes a mess all over the place, spreading jelly on  unopened bread 
> packages, table-tops, and other children, just by  following the 
> instructions literally.  The teacher is simulating a  computer here.
>
> In the RubyConf discussion we decided that our popular books and 
> tutorials don't always do a very good job of teaching you how to  think 
> like that.  Therein lies at least one hurdle of learning to  program.
>
> Here's another interesting point:  most of us who have been speaking  to 
> machines for a reasonable period of time can pick up new languages  pretty 
> easily.  The reason is that we already have a lot of practice  with the 
> thinking-dumb part and we just need to learn the new  syntax.  (Our books 
> and tutorials *are* good at teaching this.)
>
> Anyway, the point of all this is:  don't panic.  We all go through  this 
> adjustment period you're in now.  It gets easier.  The problem  is that 
> you're just way too intelligent.  Don't worry though, we'll  have you 
> dumbed down in no time!  :D
>
> Welcome to programming.
>
> James Edward Gray II
>
>