I took a brief look at activemessaging. Looks great. Then I take a
look at the roadmap and see that all the tickets logged are actually
spam.

No tickets logged, no milestones defined. I take a look at the
timeline and it's all spam too so no code checked in either.

To me this is one of the biggest frustrations of dealing with ruby and
rails. The libraries are in a unfinished state and are not being
worked on actively. Examples.

The DBI ADO library is b0rked. The answer seems to be to use ODBC. I
volunteered to work on the libraries if somebody could integrate my
work with DBI but nobody is interested.

I was excited about railscron and it's been dumped and replaced with
something which has no cron functionality at all (threading problems
from what I can gather).

I tried various AGI implementation for asterisk and the same story.
RAGI hasn't been touched in a year, the rubyforge forums questions go
unanswered, patches that were submitted are not integrated, bugs not
fixed, etc.

I don't know what the answer is. I am grateful that talented people
have dedicated their time and effort to create these libraries in the
first place but it's very hard to tell which libraries are robust,
which ones are abandoned, which ones are not being worked on because
they are stable and don't need any more work.



On 10/6/06, Brian McCallister <brianm / apache.org> wrote:
> On Oct 4, 2006, at 10:59 AM, Francis Cianfrocca wrote:
>
> > In my example, what I asked was: what if I offered you a message-
> > queueing
> > product *that supported JMS* ...... and happened to be written in
> > Ruby.
> > No one's asking you to learn a new language, that would be
> > singularly poor
> > marketing. ;-) My point with this example is that there are
> > elements of
> > today's application-support stack that could do with some major
> > improvements, and Ruby might be a good language to use for them.
>
> How about one written in Java which supports Ruby (and C, Python,
> PHP, Perl, C#, C++, Pike, as well as JMS)?
>
> 1) Install and start ActiveMQ ( http://incubator.apache.org/activemq/ )
>
> 2) 'gem install stomp' or http://svn.codehaus.org/stomp/ruby/trunk/
>
> 3)
> --
>    require 'stomp'
>    client = Stomp::Client.new("username", "password", "localhost",
> 61613)
>    client.subscribe("/queue/SOMETHING.NIBBLE") do |msg|
>      puts msg.body
>    end
>    client.join
> --
>    require 'stomp'
>    client = Stomp::Client.new("username", "password", "localhost",
> 61613)
>    10.times { client.send("/queue/SOMETHING.NIBBLE", "Hello!") }
> --
>
> 4) See http://incubator.apache.org/activemq/stomp.html for more
> details on getting the exact behavior you want.
>
> 5) See http://dev.tirsen.com/trac/activemessaging for a framework
> around it which is designed to play nicely with a certain popular web
> framework in Ruby.
>
> 6) See also Gozirra ( http://www.germane-software.com/software/Java/
> Gozirra/ ) for a lighter-weight messaging solution which supports the
> same spread of clients.
>
> -Brian
>
>
>