On 9/17/06, Francis Cianfrocca <garbagecat10 / gmail.com> wrote:
> On 9/17/06, Joan Iglesias <joan.iglesias / yahoo.es> wrote:
> >
> >  and because there isn't a big company behind (like in Java), that forces
> > backward compatibility ALWAYS.
>
>
> Java has a long and annoying history of breaking older versions.

Can you please point me to real examples? Java is one of the few
languages I know that has guaranteed backward compatibility. So, I
would really like to hear real examples, otherwise this sounds like
missinforming. And please do not mix backward compatibility with bugs.

./alex
--
.w( the_mindstorm )p.



> of the reasons why companies that ship Java-based products generally require
> a specific Java version. And Sun, in their infinite wisdom, made it a
> violation of their license to ship a runtime package that you know will work
> with your code, so this solution is only available to companies that are
> able and willing to pay Sun to make an exception for them.
>
> Microsoft and Intel are the companies that have always been really
> aggressive about preserving back-compatibility. And developers have rewarded
> them richly for it.
>
>