On Sun, Sep 03, 2006 at 02:47:39AM +0900, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:
[...]
} I've found the typical "xterm/konsole" window on Linux systems is often
} unreadable with a white background and the typical Linux text color
} scheme. The pastel backgrounds are quite a bit better than white, but it
} really works best for me on a black background, so that's what I use.

s/Linux/some Linux distributions/

Thankfully, Debian does not seem to do foolish things with the shell
prompt, as many others do.

} One thing I do find myself changing often is when I'm editing a (Gentoo)
} config file in Vim. The comments tend to be user instructions on how to
} set the parameters. On a black background, Vim colors the comments a
} dark-ish blue that's almost unreadable, so I go ":syn off" to read them.

Someone already pointed out that you need to :set bg=dark

} Actually, as long as I've been programming, I never found language
} syntax coloring all that useful. It's certainly not necessary.

For a good long time I thought the proponents of syntax coloring were just
wimps leaning on a crutch, or the sorts of fools who used Enlightenment
(well before GNOME or KDE, there was the godawful eyecandy known as
Enlightenment).

Then I decided to try it for myself to see what all the fuss was about.
Yes, I can still program effectively in plain black and white without so
much as an underline. For that matter, I could write code in ed if I had
to. Just as a visual editor is an improvement over a line editor like ed,
syntax coloring is an improvement over plain visual editing.

Once you've used it long enough for the colors to be meaningful to you,
it's faster and easier to read code. Comments can be closer to the code
they refer to since they don't need as much whitespace to bring attention
to them. Certain typos are easier to notice when they change the color of
the word.

On a different note, I'll mention that I use a light beige background for
my shell and editor windows, but a nearly black background for reading
email. Why? It's just more comfortable for *me* that way.

--Greg