"Austin Ziegler" <halostatue / gmail.com> wrote:
>On 8/31/06, Floyd L. Davidson <floyd / apaflo.com> wrote:
>> There are two Eskimo languages, and each of them has just about
>> the same number of terms for snow that English does.  Swedish,
>> Norwegian, Danish and Russian all most certainly have an equal
>> number too.
>>
>> As for "Inuit", keep in mind that not all Eskimos are Inuit, and
>> the others (not to mention some who actually *are* Inuit),
>> distinctly do *not* like to be called Inuit.
>
>However, Eskimo *is* a derogatory term applied by other natives first.

There are two claimed etymologies that have a claim to being
valid.  One of the, which Canadian anthropologists Jose Mailhot
supports, is that came from words meaning "People who speak a
different language".  The other is from Ives Goddard (at the
Smithsonian Institute), who thinks it means "snowshoe netter".

The idea that it means "eaters of raw meat" is a bit silly,
since neither side would have considered that derogatory anyway.
It does fit European derived perceptions of a good insult
though, which suggests where the idea came from.

>> The Inuit in Canada and Greenland would prefer to be called
>> Inuit, and since there are no Yupik Eskimos there, it makes
>> sense.  But in Siberia all Eskimos are Yupik.  And in Alaska
>> there are both Inuit and Yupik, so we use the term Eskimo with
>> regularity.  In particular because the Inuit Eskimos in Alaska
>> do *not* like the term Inuit, and call themselves Inupiat!
>
>That's because they're *not* Inuit, they're Inupiat. Different tribes,
>different names. (One would not call an Ojibwe an Iroquois. You'd be
>wrong.)

Inupiat *is* Inuit.  The words have very slightly different
connotations.  The people, the language, and the culture are all
the same, with of course minor regional variations as one goes
from western Alaska all the way to eastern Greenland.

The difference between Inupiat, Inuit and Inupik is the same as
between Yup'ik, Yupik and Yupiaq.

>> Regardless, the term Eskimo is *not* derogatory, and happens to
>> be the one an the *only* term in the English language which
>> encompasses all Eskimo cultures, languages, or peoples.
>
>This is untrue. It's a derogatory term introduced. Most people didn't
>*learn* it as a derogatory term, but it is no less derogatory for that
>oversight.

What you are stating has no basis in reality.  Where did you
learn about Eskimos?  I know a few thousands of Eskimos, all of
whom call themselves Eskimos.

-- 
Floyd L. Davidson            <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)                         floyd / apaflo.com