Phil Tomson wrote:

>That's good news!
>My own 2cents: 
>
>I especially like chapter 5 (OOP and Dynamicity in Ruby) in the current 
>edition of TRW.  I hope that perhaps a similar chapter on metaprogramming can 
>be added.
>
>Also: I would like to see the second edition stick to advanced Ruby 
>programming topics/philosophy and mostly stay away from specific libraries (so 
>basically staying away from a lot of the things you list above ;-)  Why do I 
>say this: because the title 'The Ruby Way' implies that you're going to impart 
>the philosophy of Ruby programming.  Your introduction leads to this as well.  
>But if you start loading up with too many specific libraries/etc. then it 
>starts looking less and less like 'The Ruby Way' and more like a tour of 
>Ruby libraries.  A lot of items in the "keyword soup" are ephemeral - 
>is Rockit really being maintained and used at this point, for example? (and 
>what about Grammar?)  I think you should focus on things that are not 
>ephemeral in Ruby.  
>
>Gems and Rake would be two 'externals' that should be included though, as they 
>are either becoming central to or exemplify The Ruby Way (Rake could be 
>covered as an example of metaprogramming, for example).  Onigurma deserves 
>coverage because it will be the new regex engine.   I'd like to see more 
>advanced coverage of things like using the various callbacks (included, 
>inherited, etc.), metaprogramming, functional Ruby (stuff like what's in the 
>"Higher order Perl" book).
>
>Leave specific GUI toolkits like Tk, or Qt to another book...
>
>I really like "The Ruby Way"; I would like to see it move more in the 
>direction of "The Ruby Way: Advanced Ruby Programming Techniques" or something 
>like that... as opposed to "The Ruby Way: A brief look at lots of 
>libraries(many of which will be obsolete by this time next year)".
>
>
>Phil
>
>
>  
>
+1. I'd also be much more interested in pure, advanced Ruby rather than 
specifics of this or that library.

Jack