On Mon, 07 Aug 2006 01:51:08 +0900, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:

> <snipped>
> A long time ago some computer scientist defined two types of languages 
> -- "core" languages and "shell" languages. Lisp, Scheme and Forth are 
> great examples of core languages ... just a few simple core concepts 
> from which you can build mighty software. And the classic shell 
> languages are PL/I and Ada ... just about anything you'd ever want to do 
> is built into the language.

Lisp is definitely not a core language.  The standard is about 1100 pages,
so it contains most of of the stuff you would expect, string handling,
arrays, hashes, math functions, etc...  Scheme is probably more what you
would call a core language.  There are documents (SRFI's) that describe
common implementations for libraries, but scheme implementations don't
have to use them to be called scheme.

Kristof