On 7/26/06, Chad Perrin <perrin / apotheon.com> wrote:
> On Thu, Jul 27, 2006 at 12:42:46AM +0900, David Pollak wrote:
>
>
> >
> > There are some applications that will never perform as in Java (e.g.,
> > stuff that's heavily oriented to bit manipulation.)  But for many
> > classes of applications (e.g., spreadsheets) Java can perform as well
> > as C.
>
> Is that heavily optimized Java vs. "normal" (untweaked) C?

No.  That's heavily optimized Java vs. heavily optimized C.  I spent a
fair amount of time chatting with the Excel team a while back.  They
cared as much about performance as I did.  They spent a lot more time
and money optimizing Excel than I did with Integer.  They had far more
in terms of tools and access to compiler tools than I did (although
Sun was very helpful to me.)

What was at stake was not someone's desktop spreadsheet, but was the
financial trader's desk.  Financial traders move millions (and
sometimes billions) of Dollars, Euros, etc. through their spreadsheets
every day.  A 5 or 10 second advantage in calculating a spreadsheet
could mean a significant profit for a trading firm.

So, I am comparing apples to apples.  A Java program can be optimized
to perform as well as a C program for *certain* tasks.

>
> --
> CCD CopyWrite Chad Perrin [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
> Brian K. Reid: "In computer science, we stand on each other's feet."
>
>


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