Alexandru Popescu wrote:
> Guys any hints for this? Sorry for pushing it to the top, but I am
> still wondering what shall I use.
> 
> once again thanks for any hints and ideas,
Your options are as follows:

- Rely on the kindness of others to provide Win32 builds of C extensions 
that you need.
- Obtain MS VC6 (somehow) and compile them yourself.
- Obtain MinGW GCC and friends and compile them yourself.

In the first and second case, you can use the One-Click Installer Ruby. 
  In the third case, you'll either need to compile Ruby yourself, or use 
the MinGW build from ruby-lang.org.

In any of the three cases, you will be relying on the C extension in 
question having been tested on Windows previously, unless you are 
willing to be the test case yourself.

I don't know about Borland's offerings here  - they may or may not be 
appropriate.

My money's on MinGW for the medium-long term.  I believe (Curt?  You 
there?) that the OCI will be converted to a MinGW build in future.

-- 
Alex

> 
> ./alex
> -- 
> .w( the_mindstorm )p.
> 
> 
> On 7/16/06, Alexandru Popescu <the.mindstorm.mailinglist / gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> Hi!
>>
>> I know there are Ruby libs outthere that are coming with C extensions.
>> To get them working you usually do a ruby setup.rb on your
>> environment. But, having C extensions, they will require that your ENV
>> has a few more things available (I assume a make, C/C++ compiler at
>> least).
>>
>> My environment is a Win XP machine, but I am not doing anything
>> related to C/C++ (and I haven't done anything for quite a long
>> time.... so my knowledge became quite rusty about). I would like to
>> hear from you, more experienced rubiest, what would be the lightest
>> env that would allow me to use such Ruby libs (I would like to hear
>> more options with some pros/cons, so that I can decide which one would
>> better fit).
>>
>> Many thanks in advance,
>>
>> ./alex
>> -- 
>> .w( the_mindstorm )p.
>>
>