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by Darren Kirby

One thing that interests me are word puzzles and language oddities. One such
example is the self-documenting panagram. If a panagram is a sentence that uses
every letter in the alphabet, then a self-documenting panagram is a sentence
that enumerates its own letter count. Simple enough, but what if we state that
the letter count must be spelled ie: 'twenty-seven' instead of '27'.  Now we
have a challenge.

A while back I wrote a script in Python that finds these sentences. Today I
rewrote it in Ruby and it found me this sentence:

	Darren's ruby panagram program found this sentence which contains exactly 
	nine 'a's, two 'b's, five 'c's, four 'd's, thirty-five 'e's, nine 'f's, 
	three 'g's,  nine 'h's, sixteen 'i's, one 'j', one 'k', two 'l's, three 'm's, 
	twenty-seven 'n's, fourteen 'o's,  three 'p's, one 'q', fifteen 'r's, 
	thirty-four 's's, twenty-two 't's, six 'u's, six 'v's, seven 'w's, six 'x's, 
	seven 'y's, and one 'z'.

My script does have its problems, and I would love to see what kind of code the
Ruby experts could come up with to find self-documenting panagrams.

There is a lot more info on self-documenting panagrams at this address:

	http://www.cs.indiana.edu/~tanaka/GEB/pangram.txt