From: Vincent Isambart [mailto:vincent.isambart / gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2006 10:14 AM
> > As mentioned in this topic, it's String#length, upcase, downcase,
> > capitalize.
> >
> > BTW, does String#length works good for you?
> 
> To have the length of a Unicode string, just do str.split(//).length,
> or "require 'jcode'" at the beginning of your code.
> For the other functions, try looking at the unicode library
> http://www.yoshidam.net/Ruby.html#unicode

I know about it. But, theoretically speaking, such a "core" methods muts be
in core. Not?
 
> > > |also, some other classes can be affected by Unicode (possibly
> > > |regexps, and pathes). Regexps seems to work fine (in my 1.9), but
> pathes
> > > are
> > > |not: File.open with Russian letters in path don't finds the file.
> > >
> > > Strange.  Ruby does not convert encoding, so that there should be no
> > > problem opening files, if you are using strings in the encoding your
> OS
> > > expect.  If they are differ, you have to specify (and convert) them
> > > properly, no matter how Unicode support is.
> >
> > Oh, it's a bit hard theme for me. I know Windows XP must support Unicode
> > file names; I see my filenames in Russian, but I have low knowledge of
> > system internals to say, are they really Unicode?
> 
> Windows XP does support Unicode file names, but I'm not sure you can
> use them with Ruby (I do not use Ruby much under Windows). Try
> converting the file names to your current locale, it should work if
> the file names can be converted to it. What I mean is that Russian
> file names encoded in the Windows Russian encoding should work on a
> Russian PC.

Yes, they works. But I can't solve the problem: need Ruby Unicode support
include filenames operations?

V.