Heh, yes I am very aware of the math-phobia in my students.  The only  
time I can really get buy-in on math concepts is in a "necessary evil"  
capacity such as for game related scenarios.  I'm certainly not going  
to have them solve fibonacci just for the sake of doing it, and there  
is naught a square root to be seen in the course work :)  I'm shooting  
for more usage of RRobots next quarter after I can eliminate most of  
the "just ignore all that stuff, I'll explain it later" which I detest  
doing.

David Koontz

Quoting Christian Neukirchen <chneukirchen / gmail.com>:

> david / koontzfamily.org writes:
>
>> With the caveat that I a have students that are
>> either 50% programming / 50% art students or 100% art students and are
>> taking a required course, my experience has been that the concepts are
>> where people are getting hung up, not the syntax/language constructs.
>
> Now you mention it, I'd like to add one more thing: Don't do too much
> math.
>
> The CS class I need to attend is led by a maths/physics teacher, and
> we use Pascal---a language that sucks at string/symbol processing.  A
> lot of my pals get turned off by calulating factorials, printing
> square roots or doing fibonacci stuff.
>
> With the languages considered here---Scheme, Ruby or Smalltalk---you
> have the great possibility to do better.  For example, write a small
> database-like system with a few hashes, or a vocabulary trainer, or
> whatever.  Sure, some of these math things are "essential", but there
> is so much more computers can do that is not number-crunching.  Your
> students will like it, especially if they are not maths-oriented anyway.
>
> --
> Christian Neukirchen  <chneukirchen / gmail.com>  http://chneukirchen.org
>
>