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The original post's title: "I love Ruby - But how bright is Ruby's future?"
Also from the original post: "I love Ruby but I don't want to waist [sic] my
time with a laguage [sic] that may not have a future." Fundamentally, this
has nothing to do with how long it will take to sell Ruby to corporations.

I tried to establish that widespread adoption by corporate IT shops (in the
way that has been achieved by Java) would be a good way to ensure that Ruby
has a bright future. But the consensus of the thread (as I read it) is that
widespread adoption by business is not material to Ruby's success, and is at
least suspicious when considered as a goal for the Ruby community.

Ruby can clearly be sold to programmers on its merits as a programming
language. (It can't be sold to IT managers on that basis, but our sense is
that their acceptance doesn't really matter.) Beyond that, I'm not sure if
we've come any closer to answering the original question.


On 6/8/06, Giles Bowkett <gilesb / gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > So ... on the main thread, where are we?
>
> Well, the main thread was about how long will it be until selling Ruby
> to corporations becomes easy. Because people like to work.
>
> The interesting thing is that if you have Gmail, the hijacked version
> of the thread -- with all its mentions of Lisp -- is showing me ads
> for jobs at Google, Art & Logic, and Jane Street Capital.
>
> Talk about Lisp and Ruby enough in Gmail, and all you get is job ads.
>
> Not to be totally intractable, but I think this totally proves my
> earlier point, that people who are looking for good programmers are
> much better customers than people who want you to code in Language X.
>
> On the other hand, the Google job ads are all for Java jobs, so,
> whatever. Who knows.
>
> --
> Giles Bowkett
> http://www.gilesgoatboy.org
>
>

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