On Sat, May 27, 2006 at 07:25:26AM +0900, Robert Klemme wrote:
> 2006/5/26, Ryan Leavengood <leavengood / gmail.com>:
> >On 5/26/06, Robert Klemme <shortcutter / googlemail.com> wrote:
> >>
> >> With all due respect, what you wrote shows that you lack some basic
> >> understanding of software engineering. Choosing between a Set and a
> >> List is by far not a premature optimization but a deliberate design
> >> decision.  Knowing algorithmic properties of these basic abstract data
> >> types is one of the required skills of someone engaged in software
> >> engineering - even if Ruby has only so few of them, and probably needs
> >> less of them because of its design.  I suggest you get yourself a book
> >> on Data Structures and Algorithms (for example the excellent books of
> >> Robert Sedgewick) and digest it.
> >
> >Believe it or not, I actually have a degree in Computer Engineering
> >and have been paid to develop software for about 10 years. I realize
> >in languages like Java and C++ you are going to consider the
> >application when choosing a data structure...that is drilled into you
> >in algorithms and data structures class. I get that.

As far as I remember, the STL (Standard Template Library) is part of
the C++ standard libraries. And it is the most complete and powerful
collection library I've ever seen, abstracting more than mere
collections. It also has an external iterator interface, I/O adaptors,
abstracts algorithmns, and can be used in a functional programming
style. Thanks to heavy use of templates and preprocessor magic, it
will blow up your binary a lot. And just for reading the docs, I
recommend a CS or math degree.

For most problems, it is like catching a fly with a nuke, and I like
ruby because it is the exact opposite: easy stuff just works, and
complex problems are solveable.

Jgen

-- 
 The box said it requires Windows 95 or better so I installed Linux