>> So, how WOULD I create an .increment operator? ... 5.increment should 
>> fail, for sanity's sake.

Gary's solution of
	myvar = myvar.succ
is a slight improvement over
	myvar = myvar + 1
but it's still more verbose than I'd hoped to have.

I don't even understand Ross's somewhat tongue-in-cheek DelegateClass. 
Goodness.

Creating a whole new Counter class, OTOH, seems like an excellent 
alternative. Since I'd indicated that the reason I wanted .increment in 
the first place was to make it quite clear that the actual value of the 
thing being incremented wasn't necessarily relevant, having an object 
that does NOT like to be divided, .times{}'ed, or otherwise cooperate 
with more normal 'integer' like behavior makes sense. (Yes, Dave's 
Counter, as written, *would* do those things, but it doesn't have to be 
so...)

Although I will admit to being rather surprised that the answer to the 
question
	How do I do this?
		whatever = 1
		whatever.increment
		p whatever
		=> 2
is apparently "You Can't."

Interesting.