------art_29463_16472780.1147657168868
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Disposition: inline

See, Corey.  You're getting it.  It just takes time, and soon enough you'll
be answering our questions.

On 5/14/06, corey konrad <0011 / hush.com> wrote:
>
> oh ok i remember reading that in the book about pointers the = method or
> operator whatever it is, makes something point to something else. So the
> only way to truly change the variable is to change what it points too.
> So i should remmeber that any time i use the = method i am causing
> something to point to something else otherwise i might run into trouble,
> that kind of makes sense. The pointer graphic -----------> helps, lol.
>
>
>
>
> Daniel Baird wrote:
> > On 5/15/06, corey konrad <0011 / hush.com> wrote:
> >>
> >> yeah a friend of mine said that PHP would be a good language to learn
> as
> >> a beginner.
> >
> >
> >
> > Aargh!  I mean, erm, no, I definitely think you're on the right track
> > with
> > Ruby.  I know it doesn't feel like it, but you seems quite close to
> > "getting" it.  You're just missing the idea that variable names kinda
> > "point" at objects.
> >
> > The object pointed at might be an array, or a string, or whatever.. with
> > a
> > whiteboard it's quite easy to illustrate the idea, but let's try this:
> >
> > when you say:
> >   info = "hello there"
> >
> > ..that makes a pointer from the variable "info" to the string "hello
> > there".  Here's a picture:
> >
> >   info ----------> String "hello there"
> >
> > When you say:
> >
> >   info = []
> >
> > ..that makes a pointer from the variable "info" to a new, empty array.
> > Doesn't matter what info used to "point" to.. it's now pointing at an
> > array.  Like this:
> >
> >   info ----------> Array []
> >
> >
> > Hope that helps a bit!
> >
> > ;D
>
>
> --
> Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
>
>

------art_29463_16472780.1147657168868--