Charlie Bowman wrote:

> Is there a time at all where and is appropriate with integers?  I know
> that and represents a . in a float (this has already been fixed with the
> plugin)

Yes. There is prior art on this. Unfortunately is might be hard to 
Google because it is older and the word "and" is a Google stop word. I'm 
pretty sure that there is a paper or chapter by Knuth that addresses 
both this issue and the English versus American usage of billion. Maybe 
this is part of TeX?

Generally, for any number z = x + y where neither x, nor y is zero and 
either x or y is a power of ten, then it is acceptable to say either

x.to_English + " " + y.to_english

or

x.to_english + " and " + y.to_english

This is recursive on x and y, but you would only want to use the second 
form once per z for numbers less than one hundred thousand. So "one 
hundred and twenty and three" is less preferred to "one hundred and 
twenty three," but "one hundred and seventy six thousand, three hundred 
and thirty two" is idiomatic.

In American speech, a single "and" usually falls in the penultimate 
position, so "one hundred and twenty three" is preferred to "one hundred 
twenty and three." The second seems more common in British English, but 
perhaps this is archaic. If there are two "ands" then they are typically 
in the first and penultimate positions.

Numbers greater than 10^8 can have up to three "ands", etc.

-- 

Ray