Pat Maddox wrote:

> 
> Personally, I have no use for closing a class.  If I were to write an
> app to be used in a financial or health care organization, I would
> probably want to be able to write some code with the knowledge that
> nobody could arbitrarily change it.
> 
> Perhaps I shouldn't even be commenting because I don't have any
> real-world experience with designing these kinds of apps.  It just
> seems to me that the main point is that sometimes a business has
> requirements with a very high cost of failure.  In these specialized
> instances, I think it's more than reasonable to protect your code.

Right.  And in those cases it may make sense to use a different 
language.  Various degrees of security often come with corresponding 
development costs.  For me, those day-to-day costs aren't justified for 
what I write; the pros and cons of Ruby work out quite well.    But, 
just as one might prefer C to Ruby when speed is the main concern, a 
different language might be called for to satisfy other needs.

Better to change languages than to change Ruby.

-- 
James Britt

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